List of facilities and places in the neighbourhood
  • Cultural Heritage
    Mirów
    Undoubtedly, it is one of the most beautiful monuments on the Trail of Eagles' Nests. A monumental castle building lies on a hill. For some its shape resembles a boat. In spite of many years of being in ruins it is still fairly impressive. The Mirowska fortress is one of the oldest fortifications of the Kraków-Częstochowa Upland. We know that a stone watchtower was erected in the mid-fourteenth century, during the reign of Casimir the Great.
  • Cultural Heritage
    Bobolice
    The Bobolice castle is located on a picturesque, rocky hill. It is one of the most famous fortresses lying along the Trail of the Eagles' Nests, in the center of the Kraków-Częstochowa Upland. The castle is situated less than a half hour walk from the twin fortress in Mirów. There are also trails for longer hikes towards the area of the Rzędkowice and Kroczycze Rocks and other attractive places in the Upland. The castle is an example of the building which after centuries of being a ruin was rebuilt in modern times.
  • Cultural Heritage
    Łutowiec
    Łutowiec is an inconspicuous village (formerly known as Oltowiec or Holtowiec). It is an old village, mentioned for the first time at the end of the fourteenth century. A medieval watchtower, of which remains have been preserved on one of the rock outcroppings, is one of the most mysterious objects of this kind in the Jura. It was probably founded in the fourteenth century, but already in the next century, it became abandoned and was beginning to fall into ruin.
  • Cultural Heritage
    Kotowice
    In the Kraków-Częstochowa Upland, there are numerous graves of soldiers from WW1 of the three clashing armies: the German, Austro-Hungarian and Russian. The first well-maintained war cemeteries were established already in the years 1917-1918. The largest necropolis can be found in a small village near Żarki - Kotowice. 1500 soldiers from all the fighting army, mostly Russians, Austrians and Germans are buried here.
  • Cultural Heritage
    Czatachowa
    In the village of Czatachowa, in the central part of the Kraków Częstochowa Upland, near Jasna Góra, a few Pauline monks began hermit lives in the 90s of the last century. In the course of time, the area of the Holy Spirit Hermitage was enclosed by a stone wall, and the monks built a small stone church of the Holy Spirit and the wooden chapel of St Anthony the Hermit. They themselves started to live in modest cottages, scattered in the foreSt
  • Cultural Heritage
    Żarki
    Near the village of Przewodziszowice in the Polish Jura, there are ruins of one of the smaller Eagles' Nests. The local defense watchtower was built probably in the fourteenth or the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The builder of the watch tower was either King Casimir the Great or Duke Ladislaus of Opole. For some time in the fifteenth century, it became a property of knight-robber Kornicz called Siestrzeniec, who according to a legend, hid the stolen treasures here.i
  • Cultural Heritage
    Żarki
    Żarki is a small town in the district Myszków. It is the seat of the urban-rural commune. Żarki is an old, medieval town, which, according to the known written sources, received town privileges before the year 1382. In 1406, Żarki was again granted privileges by King Ladislaus Jagiello. In the seventeenth century, due to a plague, the town changed its location. On the site of a once existing wooden chapel, there are stone ruins of the eighteenth-century church of Saint Stanislaus, which are preserved and open to the public.
  • Cultural Heritage
    Włodowice
    In 1914, at the beginning of the bloody First World War, the area of the Polish Jura became the scene of a particularly fierce fighting of the allied German and Austro-Hungarian army against the Russians. Only in November 1914, around 70,000 German and Austrian soldiers were killed. The dead were buried in special military cemeteries, one of which we can see in Włodowice near Zawiercie.
  • Cultural Heritage
    Włodowice
    Włodowice, leżące na Wyżynie Krakowsko-Częstochowskiej, w powiecie zawierciańskim, to stara miejscowość - wzmiankowana już w 1220 r. Przez niemal pięć wieków posiadała prawa miejskie, które otrzymała w 1386 r., zaś utraciła w wyniku rosyjskich represji po powstaniu styczniowym. Obok zrujnowanego, XVII-wiecznego pałacu, w miejscowości wart obejrzenia jest kościół św. Bartłomieja, który wzniesiony został na początku XVIII w.